College or Career?

The necessity of college has been a debate since the College of William and Mary opened in 1693.  Many people think that college is fundamental, but some people think that it is unnecessary. Those people believe that you can get a good job even without a degree. This is true, however it will not be a good paying one. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, “$30,000 is the average salary for non- college grads in America.” This is not a good yearly salary. A person living off $30,000 a year would live in minimum standards.

The average salary for someone with a college degree is, $45,000, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. There is a significant difference between college paying jobs and non- college paying jobs, as an adult. People who do not think that money matters are wrong. This is true because, money and a good job are crucial to having a house, supporting a family or having nice things.

Some people believe that college is a waste of time and money. Sometimes this is true because CNBC.com found that, “70% of 2016 college graduates are in student debt.” Student debt is a fear among many people graduating high school. Student loans are very complicated. However, for many, this is the only option.

According to the Department of Education.gov, 66% of college students graduated in 2016. This is a competitive rate. Now, for the Ivy League schools, colleges have small application rates. For example, Harvard.com stated that, “They accepted 14.5% of all applicants”. Also, the degree you choose is impactful for your college application. This matters because every college has different degree programs.

College is very important and fundamental. Without a degree, you will most likely end up with a low- paying job you will not like. College should be mandatory, to promote jobs and overtime help the economy. What college do you want to go to?

https://college.harvard.edu/admissions
https://www.forbes.com/sites/zackfriedman/2017/02/21/student-loan-debt-statistics-2017/
https://nces.ed.gov/
https://www.ed.gov/